2020 Forestry Conference Program

Refresh Table

Check back regularly for updates to the Wednesday, Thursday, or Friday sessions.

Wednesday, February 5
8:00 am–12:30 pm

FIELD TOUR*
North Cowichan Municipal Forest and BC Forest Discovery Centre (lunch provided).

Additional cost added to your conference registration fee. Cost: $45. Only 40 spaces available.

Participants to meet on Gordon Street, East side of Vancouver Island Conference Centre (VICC), at 7:30 am for the 8:00 am departure.

The North Cowichan Municipal Forest consists of approximately 5,000ha of fee simple, private land owned by the Municipality and managed by its Forestry Department as a working forest for the benefit of local residents.
 
Stops on the tour include recent fire and blowdown salvage harvesting where current operational and silviculture practices will be reviewed. A third stop will showcase a previously harvested area with a popular trail within the harvest area where current strategies and challenges of working with recreational users within the working forest will be discussed.

The tour continues to the BC Forest Discovery Center with its new interactive exhibit, Forest Forever, showing why BC’s forests are unique in the world and  how science and technology are helping us sustainably manage our forest resource.

12:00 pm

Registration Opens

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby

1:30 pm–3:00 pm

IN-DEPTH DISCUSSION
What is Old Growth and How Much is Enough?

Location: Shaw Auditorium

Forest professionals are faced with increased pressure from the public in the form of campaigns to halt the harvest of old growth trees while there is less trust in the profession to manage public lands. How do we move forward from here?  Currently there are many perspectives on how old growth should be managed, ranging from full preservation to maintaining the status quo.  While it is unlikely that there will ever be complete agreement on the question of how much old growth, this session will discuss: 

  • What actually is out there and what management is taking place to ensure that there will be old growth for future generations?;
  • What tools can we make available for the professional to manage the old growth resource to ensure they are protecting those values held as important by society?; and
  • How do we communicate information about the old growth resource and management strategies to the public?  
1:30 pm–3:00 pm

IN-DEPTH DISCUSSION
The Role of Herbicides in Forestry

Location: Nanaimo River Room

Managing deciduous competition using glyphosate is under scrutiny throughout BC and the safety of herbicide use to both humans and wildlife is highly questioned by the public. Forest professionals are faced with a difficult task: meeting legal obligations to produce a “free growing” plantation free from crop tree competition where the most effective treatment option might be to use herbicides when there is an increase in public concern/scrutiny on the safety and usefulness of herbicides. Are herbicides important to have in the tool box for plantation management to help control competing vegetation including invasive species? How should forest professionals account for the public’s concerns?  Are there potential impacts and/or implications for the long term timber supply and other values if herbicide is not able to be used? Is glyphosate a tool we can do without or is it an important option that’s getting a bad rap?

3:00 pm–3:30 pm

COFFEE BREAK

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby

3:30 pm–5:00 pm

PLENARY PANEL
Thinking Locally: BC Communities and Forest Management

Location: Shaw Auditorium

Forest Minister Doug Donaldson has said that the future of forest management in BC will involve communities having more control over decisions regarding local resources. Will community input and involvement foster an increased commitment to making good use of the resources we do harvest and ensure that local benefits, from wildfire risk to employment, will result? Forest professionals will benefit by looking more closely at the role that communities currently play in the industry and the issues. What role should or could communities play in the future of forest management? What is the public interest in forest management and what is the politician’s role in defining it?

7:00 pm–10:30 pm

TRADE SHOW

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby

7:00 pm–10:30 pm

ICEBREAKER RECEPTION

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom

9:00 pm

Registration Closes


Top

Thursday, February 6
7:00 am

Registration and Trade Show Opens

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom

7:00 am–8:00 am

BREAKFAST

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

7:15 am–8:00 am

OPENING WELCOME

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

8:00 am–9:00 am

KEYNOTE
The Professional Governance Act

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

9:15 am–10:30 am

BREAKOUT SESSION 1
Too Much Water; Not Enough Water: Forest Hydrology in a Changing Climate

Location: Shaw Auditorium

In the past few years there have been many headlines that speak about how forestry practices are threatening drinking water, worsening draughts and consequently damaging fish habitat and water supply. What do we currently know, and what do we need to find out in order to be confident that forest harvesting practices aren’t causing problems, particularly in the face of climate change?

BREAKOUT SESSION 2
Wildfire:  Adapting and Managing for Continued Change

Location: Nanaimo River Room

Wildfire behaviour has changed significantly over recent years, causing significant losses to forests and to communities. National fire researchers are predicting that climate change is worsening the triple threat of plentiful dry fuel to burn, frequent lightning strikes and dry, windy weather which will ensure that these catastrophic fires are going to become more common.  What are we doing both provincially and nationally in research and innovation to adapt to our current circumstances and lessen the risk to forests and communities due to wildfire?  What practical aspects are available to forest managers in their day to day work to combat the risk of wildfire?

BREAKOUT SESSION 3
Diversity in Forestry: Why Should I Care?

Location: Departure Bay Room

As we talk more about diversity and inclusion in the forest sector, it becomes apparent that the participants in the conversation tend to be women, indigenous people, and others that are less represented in the industry.  In order to create a shift in our demographics, the whole industry needs to have the conversation together, and this can start from the understanding that we have a problem… but also an opportunity. Learning how to adjust the way we recruit, hire and work can open the door to new perspectives participating in the industry and moving it towards an innovative and progressive future.  This panel will explore the benefits of a more diverse industry, why all forest professionals should work together to move these initiatives forward, and discuss some inclusive strategies that forest professionals can utilize to recruit the next generation.

10:30 am–11: 00 am

COFFEE BREAK

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom A & B

11:00 am–12:00 pm

BREAKOUT SESSION 4
Topic To Be Announced

Location: Shaw Theatre

BREAKOUT SESSION 5
Lessons from the Forest Practices Board: Managing for Fish Habitat

Location: Nanaimo River Room

The FPB is completing a special investigation into effect of forest practices on fish habitat. This is the second part of the two part series looking at fish habitat in BC. This investigation will focus on how well fish habitat is conserved under FRPA.

  • Licensees’ compliance with FRPA’s requirements to protect fish habitat; and,
  • Whether, and to what extent, planning and practices by forest and range licensees are contributing to the protection of fish habitat at both the site and watershed levels in sample watersheds know to have significant fish values.

BREAKOUT SESSION 6
The Art of Public Engagement: Sharing the Story of Sustainable Forest Management

Location: Departure Bay Room

The public has more and more questions about what is happening in the woods. In many communities, residents are demanding influence in harvest activities, and with social media fanning the flames, their calls to action are being heard broadly. Changes to FRPA are encouraging more public engagement. How do forest professionals engage the public in an effective way? What kind of information is important, and what kind of actions will satisfy a public that is worried about climate change and the future of our forests? What role does media play, and how do we get our messages out in an effective way?

12:00 pm–1:30 pm

KEYNOTE LUNCHEON WITH JORDAN TOOTOO

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

1:45 pm–3:00 pm

72nd ABCFP ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING**

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C
**Members are free to attend. No registration required.

3:00 pm–4:00 pm

CONVERSATION WITH COUNCIL

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

5:30 pm–6:30 pm

EXHIBIT HALL HAPPY HOUR

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom A & B

6:30 pm–11:00 pm

PRESIDENT’S AWARDS BANQUET

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

6:30 pm

Registration and Trade Show Closes


Top

Friday, February 7
7:00 am

Registration and Trade Show Opens

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom A & B

7:00 am–8:00 am

BREAKFAST

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

8:00 am–9:15 am

PLENARY
Ministry of Forest, Lands, Natural Resource Operations and Rural Development Representative

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C

9:15 am–9:45 am

COFFEE BREAK

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom A & B

9:45 am–11:00 am

BREAKOUT SESSION 7
What’s a Forest Worth? Forest Resources, Ecosystem Services, and Natural Capital

Location: Shaw Auditorium

Traditional methods of forest valuation focus on timber extraction and wood resource utilization in the form of saw logs, pulp logs, and biomass for example. This session seeks to highlight alternative means for valuation of natural resources outside of the traditional methods. This session will focus on economics and natural resources with specific attention to the terms Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital within the context of forest management and implications to the working forest.

BREAKOUT SESSION 8
Reconciliation and Coastal Forest Revitalization


Location: Nanaimo River Room

A goal of the Coast forest sector revitalization is to foster stronger business-to-business relationships between BC Timber Sales, major licensees, and First Nations. In recent years, several coastal First Nations and their forest industry partners have been exploring new ways of doing business. Meaningful First Nations involvement in the forest sector is not only a step towards reconciliation, it is also essential for providing operational certainty for forest management on the BC coast.

BREAKOUT SESSION 9
The State of BC’s Forest Inventory


Location: Departure Bay Room

A panel discussion on the key findings from blue ribbon panel on BC forest inventory and next steps as they relate to practicing forest professionals.

11:00 am–11:30 am

COFFEE BREAK

Location: Newcastle Island Lobby and Mt Benson Ballroom A & B

11:15 am–12:00 pm

ABCFP ADVISORY RESOLUTIONS SESSION

Location: TBA

12:00 pm

Registration and Trade Show Closes

12:00 pm–2:00 pm

INDUCTEES’ RECOGNITION LUNCHEON

Location: Mt Benson Ballroom D & C


Sponsored by:


Top

Conference Centre Floor Plan:

Top